Workshops

Workshops
Workshops2018-09-25T20:58:55+00:00

Roll up your sleeves!

Register and Select Your Workshops Today!
STEM Conference Opens!
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Discover What Workshops We Have!

Workshops cover a cross-section of STEM subjects with emphasis on lessons appropriate for students in grades 3-8. Workshop sessions are led by elementary and middle school teachers, STEM specialists, VMI faculty, and other college professors. Sessions are available on a first-come, first serve basis and fill up quickly!

We are posting descriptions of each workshop by track. A notification email will go out to registered attendees with a link to sign up for workshops.  Click on the session matrix (left) to see the overview of our schedule or scroll down to see titles, full descriptions, and bios for the main presenter for each.

Tuesday – Workshop A
10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Subject: Technology

Abstract:

WeVideo is the online video editor that makes it easy to capture, create, view and share your movies at up to 4K resolution for stunning playback anywhere. With WeVideo Essentials, you have unlimited use of hundreds of thousands of licensed and royalty-free video clips, images and music tracks everything you need to create pro-looking videos in minutes, at your fingertips. It’s like having a production crew on staff.

Learning Objectives:

  • Reinforcing subject matter and communicating with parents
  • Demonstrating the ease of using WeVideo by students of all ages

Clifton Jones Bio:

VTEEA Past President, Program of the Year VTEEA 2016, Emerging Leader Award ITEEA 2017, DTE Award ITEEA 2018, MS with 8 endorsements 28 years of teaching experience presented at VMI 3 year, VCEC 6, Showcase ITEEA 3 years

Subject: Math

Abstract:

Fun + Effective Activities gives math teachers of grades 6-8 useful tools to make instruction more hands-on and engaging. The workshop features content from the National Math Club, a free MATHCOUNTS program, giving teachers strategies to implement and differentiate activities and maximize the program’s impact on their students. Participants receive (1) HANDS-ON LEARNING: We believe students of all ages learn better when the instruction is hands-on, fun and engaging, which is why during our workshop teachers have the opportunity to do all of the activities they will use with their students later. This also gives teachers a sense of the pace of activities, making it easier to incorporate them into lesson plans. (2) RELEVANT & ENGAGING MATERIAL: Workshop attendees walk away with resources and ideas they can use in their middle school classrooms immediately. All materials have been designed to support differentiated instruction in heterogeneous classrooms. Attendee feedback on previous post-workshop evaluations (including at VMI the past two years) has been overwhelmingly positive. For example, when asked to evaluate the statements? I will incorporate materials and ideas from the is workshop into my club and classroom teaching? and Was the workshop a good use of my time? on a scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree) the average scores given by attendees was 4.62 and 4.85, respectively.

Learning Objectives:

To engage teachers in hands-on gameplay and reveal the myriad of mathematics concepts that can be explored through the context of those same games.

Teachers will walk away knowing how to use the hands-on games in their classrooms to supplement instruction, as well as gain an understanding of how each game can be differentiated to support their individual students’ needs.


Cara Norton Bio:

Cara Norton has been with the MATHCOUNTS Foundation for four years. As Manager of Outreach, Cara Norton is responsible for expanding MATHCOUNTS programming to educators and students across the country. The author or editor of seven program resource books, Norton has developed numerous materials specifically to introduce the National Math Club to new participants. Recently she spearheaded efforts to overhaul the program?s content to make it easier to differentiate in any middle school classroom. She also has led more than a dozen workshops and outreach events for educators and local communities. She earned her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 2011 and is currently pursuing her M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction with a focus in Gifted Education from the University of Virginia.

Subject: Integrated STEM

Abstract:

The integration of the Microsoft One Note class notebook provides a platform for a cohesive, organized electronic notebook suitable for classroom notes, collaborative work, laboratory notebook, project-based learning, and homework as part of the STEM classroom. Students and teachers need only have access to the free Office 365 for Education accounts.

Learning Objectives:

  • Teachers will begin to think about incorporating the One Note class notebook into their STEM courses.
  • Teachers will create a demo notebook to help organize and practice with class notebooks.

Curtis Barker Bio:

Mathematics Department Chair, Physics, and Computer Science teacher. Moodle system administrator. Adjunct Physics Instructor. Degrees: Ed.D. Organizational Leadership, MA Physics Education, BS Physics. Alma Maters: Shenandoah University, University of Virginia, Morehead State University, Virginia Military Institute (Class of 1993). Specialties: STEM Instruction and integration, Data Analysis, Cross-Curricular Integration of STEM. Having taught more than 30 different STEM courses and worked with teachers at all grade levels, as well as having taught many students in multiple disciplines, I have developed skills and techniques for integration different aspects of STEM at multiple levels.

Subject: Integrated STEM Science

Abstract:

In the following workshop/presentation we will discuss the art of Inquiry & Experiential or, “Hands-On” learning in the middle school classroom, and how to bridge the “gap” between elementary and high school curriculum with highly engaging and rigorous curriculum in the classroom. Examples of how to incorporate inquiry into the classroom will be discussed and shown, and strategies will be given on how to engage students with relevant questions related to the state curriculum that also engages students in 21st-century learning.

Learning Objectives:

To increase awareness and comprehension on how to incorporate inquiry into the classroom.

Teachers will come out with a better understanding of what inquiry is, and how to incorporate this methodology within their classroom and across the curriculum.


Ronda Malcolm Bio:

My name is Ronda Malcolm. I am a teacher in Botetourt County Public Schools. I have 11 years of public school teaching experience, and 19 years of experience in teaching through volunteer work, and private tutoring. I currently teach eighth-grade Advanced STEM Research and Physical Science at Read Mountain Middle School.  I have also taught eighth-grade Advanced English, math remediation, and have experience within the sixth-grade general science classroom.

My educational background includes a BA in Child Development with concentrations in Science and Social Science, a Masters degree in Elementary Education, and dual Ed.S degrees in Curriculum and Instruction and Administration and Supervision.  I am highly qualified to teach all subjects in the Pre-K through 6th-grade setting, and Middle School Science and Social Science.  My undergraduate degree focused on Middle school education, while my Master’s degree and various other continuing college classwork and internships picked up my elementary setting endorsement.   Finally, I am licensed through the state of Virginia as a K-12 administrator.

Subject: Project Based Learning

Abstract:

It will be a hands-on workshop where teachers will be able to explore blade design and discuss classroom implementation of key wind energy concepts in preparation of a KidWind Challenge. Participants will get to explore through structured experiments on how to build a wind turbine. They will utilize pre-made blades to generate electricity and explore how to maximize the power output of a wind turbine. Blade design and engineering are two of the more complicated and important aspects of current wind turbine technology. Today engineers strive to design blades that extract as much energy from the wind as possible in a variety of wind speeds while making sure that they remain durable, quiet, and affordable. This engineering process requires a great deal of scientific experimentation, modeling, and testing. These sessions will offer participants all of these experiences.

Learning Objectives:

1) Participate in the engineering design process. 2) Understanding how blade design variables affect power output. 3) Knowing how to improve and optimize wind turbine blades.

1) Participate in the engineering design process. 2) Understand how blade design variables affect power output. 3) Know how to improve and optimize wind turbine blades.


Remy Pangle Bio:

Remy is the Director of Education and Outreach and State Facilitator for the Wind for Schools (WfS) program in Virginia. She works mainly with educators and school administrators to bring meaningful wind (and all alternative) energy education into the classroom. She also has an interest in offshore wind and other sources of ocean renewable energy. Remy has a background in Integrated Science and Technology as Oceanography.

Subject: Engineering

Abstract:

Every day teachers are faced with the challenge of creating ways for students to “think outside the box”. It is our responsibility to help them to take the principles we are teaching in the classroom and apply them to the real world problems that they face in the world around them. Engineers face the challenge of designing more robust buildings to withstand earthquakes, tsunamis, and hurricanes. Earthquake-proof buildings will bend and sway with the motion of an earthquake, instead of cracking and breaking under the pressure. Your Mission: Work with your small group to solve a real-world problem. Real-World Problem: Engineers and scientists cannot prevent earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, or other natural disasters, so they instead need to work together to design buildings that can safely endure these disasters. Materials: 30 toothpicks, 30 mini-marshmallows, one tray of jello You will be given 20 minutes to design, implement/build, and test your “disaster-proof building” with your group. Upon testing, you will make modifications based on your testing results. This is just one example of how to take the scientific method and the ability to think critically and make it a hands-on activity.

Learning Objectives:

1) relate various side effects of earthquakes, tsunamis, mudslides, & hurricanes (natural disasters) 2) interpret weather data and find more ways to give advanced warnings 3) summarize and walk through ways to reduce damage caused by these disasters

The students would be able to answer these questions: 1) What real-world problems can the students use their designs to solve? 2) How do these activities relate to your real world, classroom, homes, & daily activities? 3) How does this change the app?


Marie McCoy Bio:

I am a middle and high school science teacher at Atlantic Shores Christian School in Chesapeake, VA. I teach Life Science, Earth Science, and Biology. I received my undergraduate training from Liberty University and have been teaching since 2005. I enjoy seeing the creative abilities of students expressed in the classroom when given real-world problems and watching them devise ways to solve them. My husband Aaron and I have three children and live in Chesapeake.

Subject: Engineering

Abstract:

Origami can be found at the intersection of math, engineering, art, and craft. Students as young as 2nd grade will enthusiastically tackle complex projects. Along the way they learn about sequencing, focus, perseverance, self-esteem, cooperative work, spatial reasoning, and -of course- countless mathematical terms and concepts. The workshop will focus on modular origami that allows students to create anything from basic cubes to more complex forms such as stellated rhombic dodecahedrons. Along the way, we will see how you might use origami to create a classroom community, in math class, with special needs children, as part of you maker-space, or just for fun. Appropriate for teachers of grades 2 through adult. Participants will leave ready to ?take-it-to-the-classroom.?

Learning Objectives:

  1. be able to read, understand, and execute origami diagrams 2. construct modular components and use them to construct a modular origami project

Participants will have the required knowledge, skill, and passion to teach origami in the classroom.


Steve Gissendanner Bio:

Mr. Gissendanner joined the teaching profession after spending 20 years in private business. He has taught middle school special education, 5th grade; and for the past three years, has worked as a gifted resource teacher at Meriwether Elementary School in Albemarle County Va. He has worked in low SES schools and more advantaged schools. With a degree in interdisciplinary middle school education, he has focused on hands-on math science integration, project-based learning, and empowering independent learners. Mr. Gissendanner currently uses origami in grades two through five to develop perseverance and self-esteem, build community, and to teach math and creativity.

Subject: Project Based Learning

Abstract:

Participants will learn how to incorporate the engineering design process in teaching 3D modeling techniques within the classroom or a school makerspace. The session will be based around, but not limited to, a design unit in which students create customized 3d printed parts for a Raspberry Pi robot called the GoPiGo and a Micro Bit Robot called GiggleBot. The design unit is a great introduction to 3D printing as it incorporates all aspects of the design cycle, teaches the tools and techniques to start 3d modeling using Tinkercad, and provides students with creative problem-solving challenges. These skills can be quickly and easily transferred to other 3D modeling projects within your classroom or makerspace.

Learning Objectives:

To teach the Engineering Design Process through 3D modeling.

Attendees will walk away with techniques for teaching and assessing students through the Engineering Design Process that they can incorporate within their STEAM classroom or Makerspace.


Stephen Erick bio:

Stephen Erick has been teaching and writing curriculum in elementary and middle schools for 16 years. His experience spans from K- 8th grade, where he now teaches middle school STEAM and CTE courses as well as run his school’s makerspace. He graduated from SUNY Fredonia with a Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary Education and later added a Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership from Old Dominion University. In 2013 he was awarded the Washington Post Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teacher of the Year award for his work as a 3rd-grade teacher and in 2016 was a second-place finisher for the Henry Ford National Innovative Teacher Of the Year Award. He has now combined a teaching career he loves with his passion for making, being creative and learning new technology.

Subject: STEAM

Abstract:

Everyone has an intuitive grasp of what a “good-weather” day looks like & of when a “bad-weather” day threatens. Your class — any grade! — can develop that intuitive grasp of the concepts into a rudimentary weather model. During this presentation, we’ll start with some classroom-ready exercises and navigate the concept roadmap from observing & recording weather data to analyses to your own forecasts to weather models. Following the roadmap and understanding the concepts, you can adapt this information to any grade level or interweave it as a cross-discipline extension into the tapestry of history, literature or even art and music. Our weather roadmap looks a lot like the surface road network across the eastern United States: traveling north on I-95 from its beginning (our bad-weather day concepts) to Canada (a full-fledged weather model) will take you through some destination locales (analysis; graphic display of data), but you’ll bypass major attractions (weather satellite interpretation) and locations with rich with history (major weather events and impacts). Our journey will stay on the I-95 map of these topics and our itinerary will aim to avoid rush hour traffic (no exit to delve into atmospheric physics), but we will try to hit the northeast corridor destinations.

Takeaways: understanding the key fundamental principles;  applying the fundamentals in modeling framework; and appreciating the application of models to science and society. Fasten your seatbelt!

Learning Objectives:

Teachers (all grades) develop an appreciation of the basic concepts of atmospheric sciences and can integrate that in their classrooms.

Teachers understand fundamentals of meteorology and modeling and applications to societal issues.


John White bio:

— VMI alum (Math, ’74);  career meteorologist: Active duty USAF; Civilian — NC DENR, Division of Air Quality (regulatory air quality modeling and permitting; AQ forecasting); Civilian Dept of Air Force — USAF Climate Center, Asheville, NC; U.S. Army Special Operations Command, Ft Bragg (Command Meteorologist)

— 20+ years’ extracurricular outreach with the American Meteorological Society K-12 teacher-focused DataStreme programs and numerous informal educator and K-12 PD workshops

Subject: Project Based Learning

Abstract:

Participants will work collaboratively to design wind turbine blades, determine the best number of blades and the best pitch of the blades that will generate the most energy. A wind experiment kit and chrome books will be used to collect data. Participants will also receive information and activities to go along with this project as well as ideas on how to assess student collaboration and final presentations.

Learning Objectives:

Participants will explore wind energy through project-based learning and collaboration.

Participants will be able to adapt this or their own classroom projects to include collaboration.

Students will research The Rocky Forge Wind Project and identify the pros and cons of wind energy.

Students will design and optimize their turbine blades for higher energy output.

Students will research and identify aerodynamic forces and apply those to their blade design.


Pam Kettelson Bio:

Pam Kettelson has been teaching for 23 years in grade levels ranging from kindergarten through high school. She currently teaches math 7, algebra, geometry, and STEM/Research at Central Academy Middle School in Fincastle, VA.

Tuesday – Workshop B
1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Subject: Math

Abstract:

In this presentation, attendees will play a variety of games as they think about and share ideas as to how to talk about them mathematically with their students. The more facile students are with numerical quantities, the more thought power they can apply to abstract concepts found in algebraic thinking. Even young children can work with variables if introduced in a way they can understand. Come play some games, learn specific concepts to teach through cards, dice, and dominoes, and talk with your colleagues about great questions to use!

Learning Objectives:

Attendees will understand better how to help students be more aware of the deep thinking they can do through games.

Attendees will leave, not only with a repertoire of games and activities they can use immediately but also have a deeper understanding of how to teach mathematical concepts through games.


Elliot Rothman Bio:

Elliot Rothman, a sixth grader, loves math, history, and games of all types. He has presented at the VMI STEM conference and the Children’s Engineering Conference for the past two years, and at VSTE in 2017. He especially enjoys learning through fun and games and is enthusiastic about sharing his passions with others.

Subject: Other-Developing Successful STEM Programs

Abstract:

Developing Community Partnerships to Establish and Support STEM Education Programs Join in an open discussion on how to develop a STEM strong staff and how community partners can support and grow STEM programs in a variety of school systems, from rural to city. Is your school a STEM desert? Tips on how to tap into local resources that support your teachers and staff will be highlighted. There will be a short presentation before participants are encouraged to highlight their success stories and ask questions. Learn from others how to successfully develop partnerships that can take your program to the next level. Session highlights will be shared with the 100kin10 initiative, a national group immersed in the development of qualified STEM teachers. Be the change! This is open for administrators, STEM advisors, teachers and anyone interested in growing a successful STEM program.

Learning Objectives:

Open forum for discussion on how to support school systems as they develop STEM programs. Based on the success of the Goochland County Public Schools STEM program (Mr. Watson driven) and Ms. Moore’s national STEM presence, we want to provide an opportunity

Offering opportunities to continue the dialog and also support districts that need assistance.


Anne Moore Bio:

Anne Moore is as a member of the first cadre of the NSTA/NCTM STEM Teacher Ambassadors, 2017-18. The STEM Ambassadors work with local, regional, and state officials in developing STEM awareness, supporting the NGSS, and promoting an understanding of the importance of preparing students for the next generation of careers. Anne is also a member of the 100kin10 national committee – Developing STEM Education in Rural Communities. The committee is working to establish a toolkit of resources to support STEM educators in rural settings. Having been a presenter at the VMI STEM Conference for the past three years, Anne is looking forward to learning more about successful STEM programs in Virginia and sharing those stories with a larger audience. Currently, Anne is the Secondary Gifted Advisor and Dual Enrollment Coordinator for Goochland County Public Schools.

Subject: Science

Abstract:

What do Benjamin Franklin, Benjamin Banneker, and Thomas Jefferson have in common? Were they all citizen scientists? amateur scientists who contributed to our current understanding of many fields. Inspire your students to follow in their footsteps. By introducing citizen science through the use of Natural Inquirer: Citizen Science Edition, ignite your students to take on a local project and contribute to current studies of practicing scientists. This is real science!

Learning Objectives:

To expose teachers to the Natural Inquirer journal to engage their middle school students in citizen science in the classroom.

Teachers will understand the basics of Natural Inquirer journals. Teachers will be able to define citizen science and will obtain several strategies for including citizen science in their classrooms.


Anne Bryant Bio:

After working in accounting for a decade, I decided to return to James Madison University to finish a degree I had started in 1993. I was certified to teach middle school science in 2011 and have been teaching at Cedar Lee Middle School as a life science teacher ever since. I have sponsored a STEM club, a STEAM club, and this year will be starting an Ecology Club. I am working on building an outdoor lab at my school so that we are doing science in the field.

Subject: STEAM

Abstract:

Fostering STEAM in the garden Dissecting Pumpkins, Growing Bird Houses and eating apple seeds Powerpoint and hands-on handling nature and applying Steam Principles.

Learning Objectives:

During this lesson, students will be able to identify the different parts of a pumpkin and describe the different functions by dissecting a pumpkin.

  • Nature-based STEAM Exploration
  • Foster Understanding of Nature Using STEAM

Donna Haley Bio:

Donna Haley is a member of Blue Ridge Environmental Educators, a Master Gardener (1996) a Master Naturalist (2012). Donna, as an ethno-botanist, taught horticulture at Virginia Western Community College at Greenfield. She is a “Tank Team” member at the Ocean in the Mountains Aquarium at Center in the Square in Roanoke. She volunteers for the Blue Ridge Mountains Council Boy Scouts of America and serves on their Council Conservation Committee. Donna is a 2015 Citizens for Clean and Green, City of Roanoke Green Academy graduate. Donna lives in Botetourt County.

Subject: Mathematics

Abstract:

Fun + Effective Activities gives math teachers of grades 6-8 useful tools to make instruction more hands-on and engaging. The workshop features content from the National Math Club, a free MATHCOUNTS program, giving teachers strategies to implement and differentiate activities and maximize the program’s impact on their students. Participants receive (1) HANDS-ON LEARNING: We believe students of all ages learn better when the instruction is hands-on, fun and engaging, which is why during our workshop teachers have the opportunity to do all of the activities they will use with their students later. This also gives teachers a sense of the pace of activities, making it easier to incorporate them into lesson plans. (2) RELEVANT & ENGAGING MATERIAL: Workshop attendees walk away with resources and ideas they can use in their middle school classrooms immediately. All materials have been designed to support differentiated instruction in heterogeneous classrooms. Attendee feedback on previous post-workshop evaluations (including at VMI the past two years) has been overwhelmingly positive. For example, when asked to evaluate the statements? I will incorporate materials and ideas from the is workshop into my club and classroom teaching? and ‘Was the workshop a good use of my time? on a scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree) the average scores given by attendees was 4.62 and 4.85, respectively.

Learning Objectives:

To engage teachers in hands-on gameplay and reveal the myriad of mathematics concepts that can be explored through the context of those same games.

Teachers will walk away knowing how to use the hands-on games in their classrooms to supplement instruction, as well as gain an understanding of how each game can be differentiated to support their individual students’ needs.


Cara Norton Bio:

Cara Norton has been with the MATHCOUNTS Foundation for four years. As Manager of Outreach, Cara Norton is responsible for expanding MATHCOUNTS programming to educators and students across the country. The author or editor of seven program resource books, Norton has developed numerous materials specifically to introduce the National Math Club to new participants. Recently she spearheaded efforts to overhaul the program?s content to make it easier to differentiate in any middle school classroom. She also has led more than a dozen workshops and outreach events for educators and local communities. She earned her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 2011 and is currently pursuing her M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction with a focus in Gifted Education from the University of Virginia.

Subject: STEAM

Abstract:

Have you just taken the position of a STEM/STEAM teacher and you are not sure what to do? Well, then this session is for you! Supplies, set up, curriculum, management, and other revelations learned during year one of a STEAM lab will be shared during this session. Bring your questions and your ideas because there will be time for sharing. This session will be filled with ideas that even classroom teachers can implement into their own classrooms. The focus is on elementary school K-5.

Learning Objectives:

STEAM Resource teachers will get insights on materials, management, and lessons to use in the elementary school. Classroom teachers can also take some of the ideas and apply it to the regular classroom.

Teachers will take back a list of supplies, experience with some of the materials, and ideas to help start a STEAM class.


Jeannine Dearmon Bio:

Jeannine Dearmon was a third and fourth-grade classroom teacher for 27 years in Chesterfield County, VA before taking the leap to being a STEAM resource teacher last year. Technology, STEM lessons, and engagement were always central in her classroom. Now she has taken her creativity to the resource room where she sees over 700 K-5th grade students weekly.

Subject: Integrated STEM

Abstract:

Explore TinkerCad and hear how Loudoun Country Day school’s STEM teachers use this simple 3D design program and 3D printing projects to complement and integrate STEM learning into core curriculum projects.

Learning Objectives:

  • Inspiration for using 3D design/printing in core curriculum and intro into TinkerCad.
  • Session participants will create a simple 3D design in TinkerCad and leave with a handout of integration ideas.

Vicki Knickerbocker and Robin Peacemaker Bio:

Vicki Knickerbocker and Robin Peacemaker make up the STEM team at Loudoun Country Day School, a preschool through 8th-grade independent school in Leesburg, Virginia. Their teaching experience spans over decades and ranges from the family and consumer sciences to robotics and programming. Their passion for STEM is timeless.

Subject: Integrated STEM

Abstract:

We describe a 4th-grade exercise intended to mesh with the structure of forthcoming revisions of science SOLs. We ask students to use metric rulers to measure the progress of the sun across a day-night map and keep track of the implications of those measurements. A central motif if this project is that students use mathematical skills at their level to study other parts of their required curriculum.

Learning Objectives:

As indicated: Why do I need this mathematics? New Answer: Because I need it right now in my other classes.

Students recognize that mathematics helps them right now.


George Rublein Bio:

Presenter worked with K-8 teachers in W&M projects for many years.

Subject: Engineering

Abstract:

Origami can be found at the intersection of math, engineering, art, and craft. Students as young as 2nd grade will enthusiastically tackle complex projects. Along the way they learn about sequencing, focus, perseverance, self-esteem, cooperative work, spatial reasoning, and -of course- countless mathematical terms and concepts. The workshop will focus on modular origami that allows students to create anything from basic cubes to more complex forms such as stellated rhombic dodecahedrons. Along the way, we will see how you might use origami to create a classroom community, in math class, with special needs children, as part of you maker-space, or just for fun. Appropriate for teachers of grades 2 through adult. Participants will leave ready to ?take-it-to-the-classroom.?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Be able to read, understand, and execute origami diagrams 2.Cconstruct modular components and use them to construct a modular origami project.

Participants will have the required knowledge, skill, and passion to teach origami in the classroom.


Steve Gissendanner Bio:

Mr. Gissendanner joined the teaching profession after spending 20 years in private business. He has taught middle school special education, 5th grade; and for the past three years, has worked as a gifted resource teacher at Meriwether Elementary School in Albemarle County Va. He has worked in low SES schools and more advantaged schools. With a degree in interdisciplinary middle school education, he has focused on hands-on math science integration, project-based learning, and empowering independent learners. Mr. Gissendanner currently uses origami in grades two through five to develop perseverance and self-esteem, build community, and to teach math and creativity.

Subject: Engineering

Abstract:

Attendees will be challenged to design and construct a structure that will float in a wind tunnel (Constructed from inexpensive materials.) at a set height for a set amount of time. Materials must be purchased using a set budget.

Learning Objectives:

To encourage following and documenting the engineering design process and the importance of modification.

Budgeting, Design Process, Modification, Shapes, Weight, Balance, Aerodynamics.

Students will work collaboratively to solve an engineering design challenge.

Students will gain an understanding of the process of and follow the engineering design process.

Students will demonstrate an understanding of shapes, weight, and balance in their relationship to aerodynamics.

Students will be required to demonstrate an understanding of materials and budgeting.


Alisa Rushing Bio:

Alisa Rushing is a 19-year veteran teacher in the fields of Agriculture Education and Technology and Engineering Education. She currently teaches at Swift Creek Middle School in Chesterfield County. She believes that students learn through failure and that every student has the ability for success. The Virginia Technology and Engineering Education Association recently recognized Mrs. Rushing as the 2018 Middle School Program of the Year for her abilities serving as an integrated STEM educator.

Subject: Project-Based Learning

Abstract:

Participants will work collaboratively to design wind turbine blades, determine the best number of blades and the best pitch of the blades that will generate the most energy. A wind experiment kit and chrome books will be used to collect data. Participants will also receive information and activities to go along with this project as well as ideas on how to assess student collaboration and final presentations.

Learning Objectives:

Participants will explore wind energy through project-based learning and collaboration.

Participants will be able to adapt this or their own classroom projects to include collaboration.

Students will research The Rocky Forge Wind Project and identify the pros and cons of wind energy.

Students will design and optimize their turbine blades for higher energy output.

Students will research and identify aerodynamic forces and apply those to their blade design.


Pam Kettelson Bio:

Pam Kettelson has been teaching for 23 years in grade levels ranging from kindergarten through high school. She currently teaches math 7, algebra, geometry, and STEM/Research at Central Academy Middle School in Fincastle, VA.

Tuesday – Workshop C
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Subject: Integrated STEM

Abstract:

In this session, teachers will be provided with an overview of 3D printing and how to implement 3D design and printing in the classroom. Teachers will be provided with an overview of Tinkercad for 3D modeling and design. They will also walk away with multiple lesson plans and ideas.

Learning Objectives:

Creating and designing innovative artifacts, using digital tools for the engineering design process.

Learn the basics of 3D printing, how to incorporate 3D printing into elementary lessons.

Brian Smith Bio:

Brian Smith has been an educator for Virginia Beach Public Schools for 8 years, spending time as a 4th and 5th-grade teacher. His last 3 years have been as an Instructional Technology Specialist. He enjoys sharing different tech tools and tips with teachers and students. Smith’s areas of specialty include various robots and 3D printing.

Subject: Other: Creativity, Writing in Content Classroom

Abstract:
Writing is not just for language arts classes – this presentation will provide an overview, including how to obtain educational accounts, of free or low-cost software, which can be used to inspire your students to write or used as an alternative assessment in content classrooms. Many students struggle with language and writing skills. Help these students experience success and develop their language skills by using elements of visual storytelling to supplement and enhance their writing. Programs being discussed include Storybird, Pixton for Schools, LucidPress, and more. Lesson plans and ideas for using these programs in the non-language arts classroom will be shared.

Learning Objectives:
Demonstrate how creative writing programs can be used in content classrooms to inspire students, develop language skills, and as alternative assessments.

Teachers will be able to use creative writing programs to develop student writing skills and as alternative assessments in content classrooms.


M Sue Way Bio:
Ms. Way began her career in K12 education teaching high school and junior high math. An interest in incorporating all of the new technologies being developed into her classroom instruction led her to becoming the self-taught, go-to person for other teachers in her school. From there, it was an easy jump to becoming a full-time instructional technology specialist helping teachers and their classes in grades

K-12 use technology as an instructional and learning tool. A fan of continuing education, Ms Way participated in a pilot program at ODU in 2001/2002 earning a TeachTech certificate, completed her NETS*T certification in 2010, and earned a second Master’s degree in Educational Technology Leadership in 2013.

Subject: Integrated STEM Mathematical Thinking to Develop Design

Abstract:

Traditional playing cards offer an accessible, fun source of game-based learning with few classroom limitations and limitless opportunities to engage in higher-order thinking. From Go Fish! to Spades or even the less ubiquitous 31, cards facilitate mathematical manipulation of numbers from simple to complex coupled with strategic decision-making for students of all ages. For example, in simple games like Go Fish, young children learn facts about card decks- there are 4 suits, 13 cards in each suit, what face cards are, to recognize numbers (and their quantity) and as they decide which cards to keep or throw away, they are intuiting skills of probability and larger concepts. Less apparent but equally beneficial are ways to use traditional card games to encourage design thinking. This hands-on presentation will cover what Design Thinking is and share several specific examples of card games which develop design thinking as one plays.

Learning Objectives:

Attendees will have a deeper understanding of design thinking and how to build student understanding and use of it in varied activities.

Attendees will not only have several activities they can use with students but a deeper understanding of how to have conversations with their students to increase understanding of higher level thinking in common games.


Paula White Bio:

Paula White is a 43-year veteran teacher who retired in 2017. She never had problems learning in school (well, almost never) because her family played games- card games, board games, puzzles and word games, plus she was always tinkering with her brothers’ erector set. She’ s been a problem solver all her life, learning to use resources to get help when stuck! On Sunday afternoons, she and her Mom would play Scrabble with a dictionary they shared- time constraints weren’t important- learning new words and teaching each other was! Her sessions center around games and what playing them teaches kids- to connect previous knowledge with new situations and to develop flexibility and creativity in the process. It is crucial that children see themselves as successful problem solvers who can persist when things b come hard or unfamiliar. Problem solvers enjoy challenges!

Subject: Integrated STEM

Abstract:

Participants will complete different components of an escape classroom. Guidelines will be provided on to create and implement escape rooms in their own classrooms. Within the lessons, teachers will be guided on how to incorporate science, math, and engineering.

Learning Objectives:

How to integrate escape classrooms as a means to introduce STEM into classroom instruction.

For the participants to develop their own escape room lessons, online resources for developing escape rooms will be provided, and ideas on how to integrate STEM within escape room lessons.


Jill Collins Bio:

Jill Collins has taught for 22 years. She received her undergraduate and Master Degree in Education with a concentration in Biology from Averett University. To prepare for the STEM Academy she has furthered her teaching experience by attending workshops and participating on Virginia Department of Education committees. Her teaching style includes inquiry and problem-based lessons while emphasizing the use of technology with hands-on activities.

Subject: Engineering

Abstract:

Six years ago Norfolk Academy (NA) hired the presenter, Dr. John Galler, with the charge to strengthen and expand the school’s STEM program. After a year visiting schools, universities, and museums, Dr. Galler wrote a curriculum for a stand-alone engineering program to be taught in NA’s lower school. This presentation will share the lessons learned from these visits, the justifications and assumptions held at the start of our program, and tips, trick, and tactics learned in the first five years of our program. This presentation will benefit administrators looking to expand their school’s engineering offerings, as well as teachers interested in bringing rewarding engineering practices into the classroom. NA’s Engineering, Design, and Innovation program strives to provide students an engineering platform by offering classes rich in project-based team challenges rooted in real-world engineering fundamentals. These projects emphasize prototype creation and the production of tangible work products. By utilizing the iterative nature of the engineering design process students develop problem solving skills and technical competence. One of our core philosophies in setting up a successful elementary level program was for students to experience and embrace failure as soon as possible through partner-based, hands-on projects with multiple iterations of building, testing and failing. Creating a “no fear of failure” mindset early on benefits students beyond an engineering classroom.

Learning Objectives:

  • To share with other school the lessons learned from our development of an engineering program.
  • Teachers and administrators gain comfort and interest in expanding school engineering offerings.

John Galler Bio:

Dr. Galler graduated from William and Mary (BS Geology, and Environmental Science; MS Marine Science) and then worked as an oceanographer for the Naval Oceanographic Office before earning his doctorate in Earth and Environmental Sciences specializing in geophysical engineering at Tulane. He then spent a decade with large environmental engineering firms as a project manager before finding his calling in teaching. His first year as a teacher was spent traveling to visit schools around the country to research best practices for teaching elementary level engineering, and then he developed and implemented a curriculum for a 1st – 6th engineering program at Norfolk Academy which is now in its fifth year.

Subject: Integrated STEM

Abstract:

While the difficulties of teaching the teaching of Math, and Science while using technology have been well-documented educators often fail to use off the shelf flight simulators for the creation of active learning experiences. In this lesson, students use the flight parameter data to determine answers to scenario-based questions. Attendees will fly a specific mission, collect data, analyze the data and compare these results with their answers from concepts taught in class, thus providing a link between Math and Science concepts taught in the class and a real-life situation.

Learning Objectives:

The objective of this session is to bridge the gap of Math and Science concepts taught in the class and real-life situations.

Attendees will collect data, analyze the data and compare these results with their answers from concepts taught in class.


Mike Speidel Bio:

Mike Speidel is currently the Aerospace Educator based at the Udvar-Hazy National Air and Space Museum in Chantilly VA. He is tasked with providing STEM-based educational opportunities to school groups who visit the museum. Prior to the Aerospace Educator position, Mike was the Instructional Designer for Loudoun County?s Online High School was a Staff Development Trainer and an Instructional Technology Facilitator. Mike also currently serves on the executive board of the Virginia Society for Technology in Education (VSTE).

Subject: Integrated STEM

Abstract:

Integrating STEM into your curriculum is one thing, but focusing an entire evening on it may feel a little overwhelming. Are you curious to know what goes into creating a STEM night for your school? Come to see how the Charlottesville City School district implements STEM nights. You will find out what went well, what needed to be changed, and what hit the editing room floor.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will understand the planning, promoting, and implementation of a STEM Night
  • Attendees will have resources to plan, promote, and implement a STEM Night in their district.

Jason Lauer Bio:

Jason Lauer joined the Charlottesville City Schools iSTEM team in January of 2017. He obtained his Bachelor of Science in physical education and health from Liberty University. An interest in technology inspired his departure from teaching middle school physical education and health for over a decade. Upon transitioning to the iSTEM team, Jason completed his Master’s degree with honors in educational technology and online instruction from Liberty University. Currently acting as iSTEM teacher at Greenbrier and Johnson elementary schools, Jason continues his pursuit to learn alongside his students, teachers, and fellow iSTEM team members.

Subject: OtherEnvironmental Engineering & PBL

Abstract:

Today’s students need to be critical thinkers and problem solvers. Project-based learning (PBL) allows students the chance to solve problems they see in their world. My students participated in the Dan River Basin Association’s (DRBA) Trout in the Classroom (TIC) program and Streamside Trees in the Classroom (STIC) program which allowed them to learn about environmental stewardship and civic responsibility at a young age. The TIC program allowed students the opportunity to raise trout eggs in the classroom, witness orderly changes in their life cycle, and ensure their basic needs were met prior to release. Students became concerned about the butterflies they were learning about and planted a butterfly garden to establish a natural habitat where butterflies can meet their basic needs throughout their life cycle. Caring for plants in the butterfly garden, students started thinking about how to better utilize rainwater and prevent it from going to storm drains. Working with Krista Hodges from the DRBA, students were able to set up rain barrels to water the butterfly garden and make plans for a rain garden. My proposal includes showing teachers how to use PBL to teach students about their environment and ways to protect it. Teachers will learn how students can set up and use rain barrels and create rain gardens at their school. I will offer a variety of ways teachers can further student learning by providing extension activities which integrate math and science in the classroom.

Learning Objectives:

  • To share with teachers how they can use outreach education to spark students interest in environmental engineering and project-based learning.
  • To encourage more teachers to use project-based learning to teach students about environmental issues resulting in students designing solutions through engineering design.

Laurie Witt Bio:

Laurie Witt is the STEM Teacher for Albert Harris Elementary School in Martinsville, Virginia. She graduated with a B.A. from Hollins University and achieved National Board Certification as an Early Childhood Generalist. Her background includes work as the NASA SEMAA Family Café Coordinator for Martinsville City Public Schools, Site Director for STEM Summer Camps at AHES, and SEMAA Camp Instructor at Patrick Henry Elementary School. Laurie worked with the Virginia Museum of Natural History for their Fall STEM + Girls Program. Laurie Witt teaches STEM to students in Kindergarten through Fifth Grade, coordinates the Trout in the Classroom and Streamside Trees in the Classroom programs at Albert Harris, and implements STEM school family nights.

Subject: Science

Abstract:

Hands-on activity teaching students about the electromagnetic spectrum using gas tubes, diffraction glasses, spectroscope, etc. Attendees will use a spectroscope to examine the spectra given off by several different emission tubes and then determine the name of the element and the type of spectrum. In order to assist the students in understanding, we will map out the spectra using Skittles for modeling the order of the wavelengths in each case. Thus, they will be able to “Taste the Spectrum.” They will model white light first using all the colors, and then they will model the spectra of several elements.

Learning Objectives:

  • To determine how spectroscopes are used to analyze visible light.
  • Students will develop a basic understanding of the visible part of the EM Spectrum and be able to identify several elements from their respective spectra.

Jeffrey W. Laub Bio:

Dr. Jeffrey W. Laub is Professor of Physics and Mathematics at Central Virginia Community College. Dr. Laub has been working with High School and Middle School students to help them better understand physics and to develop an appreciation of all sciences. Previous, Dr. Laub served on the faculty at Rogers State University, Macon State College, Alice Lloyd College and Jamestown Community College. Dr. Laub earned a Ph.D. from the Lehigh University, an M.S. from St. Bonaventure University, and a B.S. from Moravian College.

Wednesday – Workshop D
10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Subject: STEAM

Abstract:

Participants will construct treehouses out of cardboard and other easily accessible recycled material. Participants will create working simple machines and circuits to incorporate into their treehouse. This session will provide teachers with a hands-on experience that they can replicate in their classroom. Teachers will leave the session with access to design briefs, rubrics, and instructions that can be used or adapted for this particular project.

Learning Objectives:

Participants will construct treehouses out of cardboard and other easily accessible recycled material. Participants will create working simple machines and circuits to incorporate into their treehouse.

This session will provide teachers with a hands-on experience that they can replicate in their classroom. Teachers will leave the session with access to design briefs, rubrics, and instructions that can be used or adapted for this particular project.


Katherine Mangum Bio:

Katherine Mangum is currently a fifth-grade science teacher at St. Catherine’s School in Richmond, VA. In addition to her teaching responsibilities, she helps coach the Middle School’s FLL Robotics teams. She holds the Master Teaching Chair in Science and is a past recipient of the Katherine B. Madden Award for Excellence in Teaching. A member of the Virginia Children’s Engineering Council, Katherine serves as president of the executive committee and participates in planning the VCEC annual convention.

Subject: Science

Abstract:

In this presentation, educators will extract DNA from strawberries and receive a workshop guide with hand-outs, background information, step-by-step instructions and science guide. We will also talk about how to adapt the same experiment with cheek cells.

Learning Objectives:

1. What is DNA? 2. Where is it found? 3. How can we extract it from cells? 4. What type of cells can we extract DNA from? 5. How can this experiment be applied to our everyday life (forensics, genealogical sites)?

Educators will extract DNA from strawberries and cheek cells and learn how this is adapted to real life experiences such as forensics and genealogical sites.


Kristy Collins Bio:

I am classically trained in Biochemistry and I have 10 years of experience in education program management and working with students and the public. Currently, I am the Director of Education and Outreach at the Biocomplexity Institute of Virginia Tech where I manage a staff of 2, conduct tours, DNA Extraction experiments, promote science awareness, write grants, run Kids’ Tech University and additional administrative needs.

Subject: Engineering

Abstract:

What happens when you think outside the box of games like Candy Land? Amazing learning, that’s what! In this session, participants will be able to sample various types of hacked games including tic-tac-toe and Candy Land. We’ll discuss how to bring these experiences to your students as well.

Learning Objectives:

Participants will be able to apply critical and creative thinking to common activities, consider ways to provide experiences to their students, and have some fun!

Participants will use the experiences and knowledge they gain to make their classrooms more experiential. They will also see that engineering doesn’t always have to cost a lot of money or require sophisticated materials.

  1. In a world that continues to be transformed by technology, children must learn to think critically, creatively and computationally.
  2. Hacking games allow students the opportunity to think differently and flexibly about familiar games. Learning to think flexibly, critically and creatively prepares students for jobs of the future.
  3. The better students can look at known things differently or from a varying point of view, the more successful they will be in jobs we haven’t even imagined yet.

Karen Richardson Bio:

Karen Richardson has been teaching and learning with educational technology for nearly 30 years, first as a classroom teacher and now as the leader of VSTE. She works with educators to provide hands-on experiences around STEM-related topics including Makey Makey and robots.

Subject: Integrated STEM

Abstract:

We wish to highlight instructional technologies such as OSMO, DASH & DOT Robots, Green Screen, and Bloxels in regards to improving student learning and critical thinking skills. We also will show ways teachers can integrate these meaningful activities into a SOL based curriculum.

Learning Objectives:

Introduce teachers to various instructional technologies that will enhance student learning especially in urban settings as related to critical thinking skills in reading, math, and science.

Teachers will learn to integrate these meaningful technology activities into a SOL based curriculum.

Kristen Shelor Bio:

Kristen Shelor holds an endorsement in Elementary Education & K-12 Social Studies. She is currently working on a Library Media Endorsement while teaching 5th grade Science in Roanoke City Public Schools. Andrew Hartman holds a secondary Social Studies endorsement and is beginning his 3rd year as a Roanoke City Instructional Technology Resource Teacher.

Subject: Engineering To Demonstrate & Implement Design Proces

Abstract:

This topic is based on years of teaching all levels of students the importance of being able to think and visualize in both 2 & 3 D space. Designs are prepared on 2D graph paper but the finished product lives in our 3D world. There will be a display of past student design ideas. Then attendees will be provided a graph paper to lay out a sample project to prepare in cardboard just as students would. This will allow them to practice the layout of design parts within a defined 2D space and how interlocking notches on parts need to be made to allow for assembly into 3D objects. Then, attendees will be challenged to come up with an original idea to use in experiencing the design process from conception to completion. Grid paper and cardboard blanks will be provided to use in this process. Attendees can take back provided materials for completion at their home school if time expires. This Design exercise can be used from primary grades thru 8th-grade middle school and beyond. Cardboard can easily be secured for no cost and is a good medium. Thin plywood may be used instead of cardboard for the final project. In equipped middle school labs, the final design may be cut out with Scrollsaws, CNC Milling machines or Laser Cutters from thin plywood. At any level, this is an easy and inexpensive STEM exercise to demonstrate the Design Process that allows for maximum individual student creativity and problem-solving.

Learning Objectives:

To allow STEM teachers at all levels to demonstrate and have students practice the Design Process of taking an Idea, expressing it with 2D drawings and creating a 3D finished artifact.

Attendees will have another tool to use to have students Design and Engineer problem solutions using materials and tools.


Allen Patton Bio:

Mr. Patton has a B.S. and an M. S. in Vocational/Technical Education from Va. Tech. He has been a Technology educator in Va. for 45 years in grades 6-12 in Fairfax, Arlington and Frederick counties and was VTEEA HS Teacher of the Year in 2003. He was an Adjunct Prof. at Northern Virginia Community College in Annandale, Va for 35 years in the Engin. Dept. teaching Engineering Graphics, CAD, and Solid Modeling.  His professional strength is in his years of experience in all forms of Drafting, Design and Graphic Communication.

Subject: Situating Design and Engineering in the STEM Classroom: an Integrative Approach

Abstract:

What should the 21st Century STEM Education classroom really look like? This presentation addresses pedagogical concerns for the STEM classroom, particularly with respect to the differences between “integrative,” “integrated,” and “problem-based” learning. Attendees are invited to explore their classroom concerns about purposeful STEM education, establish their own definition(s) and visions for the 21st Century STEM classroom, and discuss Integrative STEM Education (I-STEM Ed.) in consonance with their classroom designs.

Learning Objectives:

  • To distinguish between Integrative STEM Education (I-STEM Ed.) and other STEM approaches.
  • To be more purposeful when designing the 21st Century STEM classroom.
  • To learn about several helpful websites that are helpful for STEM educators.

Mattie Quesenbery Smith Bio:

Currently enrolled in the Ph.D. program for Integrative STEM Education, Curriculum, and Instruction at Virginia Tech, Smith teaches rhetoric, literature, and composition classes at Virginia Military Institute (VMI) and Blue Ridge Community College (BRCC).  She often integrates STEM topics into rhetoric, composition, and English classes, and she possesses a creative, energetic vision for research and writing across disciplines to support engineering and design in STEM.

Subject: Integrated STEM

Abstract:

eCYBERMISSION (sponsored by the United States Army) is a free, nationwide STEM competition for students in grades 6-9. The U.S. Army Educational Outreach Program is committed to answering the Nation’s need for increased national STEM literacy and to expand STEM education opportunities across the country to open doors to new career paths for American students that lead to a brighter tomorrow. The practices included in the NGSS are all based on exploring and solving problems. The act of engaging students in this problem solving can often be a problem in itself. In this interactive workshop, participants will:

-Work on and solve puzzles that can be taken to the classroom to model problem-based learning

-Learn through practice that failure is an important part of learning, and it needs to be a step along the path to success

-Share how the online STEM competition, eCYBERMISSION gives students a chance to explore and solve problems using science and engineering and how teachers and students can participate at no cost Participants will complete puzzle challenges introducing participants to the concept of “failure.” Different types of problems are introduced (phenomena, community-based, puzzles) and each is explained/examples given. Participants will also hear an overview of the eCYBERMISSION program, a part of the United States Army Educational Outreach Program.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Work on and solve puzzles that can be taken to the classroom to model problem-based learning
  2. Share how the online STEM competition, eCYBERMISSION gives students a chance to explore and solve problems using science and engineering and how teachers can seamlessly incorporate the competition into their curriculum
  3. Learn through practice that failure is an important part of learning, and it needs to be a step along the path to success
  4. Encourage participants to register for the 2018-2019 eCYBERMISSION competition

Alexandra Wakely Bio:

Alexandra Wakely currently serves as the STEM Outreach Specialist for eCYBERMISSION. Her previous positions include Program Coordinator and Program Manager of the Professional Development Programs at NSTA. Prior to joining NSTA in 2015, she held the positions of 4th Grade Teacher in Prince William County Schools, and K-5 Science Lab Teacher at Prince William County Schools. Alexandra resides in Arlington, Virginia. She holds B.A. from Mary Baldwin University and an M.A. from George Mason University.

Subject: Science

Abstract:

In this session, participants will remember some old favorites and discover new games and hands-on activities that make learning about the environment fun. Each participant will receive a “how to” notebook detailing how to make and use activities like: conservation jeopardy, poop toss, soil babies and seed bombs. A great way to engage elementary students.

Learning Objectives:

  • To realize the positive impact of games and fun on learning.
  • For participants to use the session as a starting point for teaching environmental topics with an element of fun.

Lindy Durham Bio:

Lindy Durham is a graduate of the University of Virginia Graphic Arts program.  Currently, the education specialist at the Henricopolis Soil & Water Conservation District in Henrico, Lindy teaches soil and water conservation concepts to students in the classroom and manages education programs throughout the county.

Subject: Engineering

Abstract:

Understanding the thermal properties of materials is critical in the design of heat-transfer-related systems. Applications range from nuclear fuel to automotive brakes, or even thermal protection systems on spacecraft entering the atmosphere. When the properties of the materials are unknown, testing must be done to get an accurate estimate of the property values. This can often be accomplished using flash diffusivity testing, where a sample of material is heated on one side using a flash from a laser. The temperature on the non-heated side of the sample is measured over time as the heat from the flash diffuses through the sample. An analysis of the resulting temperature curve can then be performed to find the properties of the material. The analysis requires a mathematical model to be developed which contains the thermal properties. The values for these properties are then adjusted until the mathematical model matches the experimental measurements as closely as possible. The results from the analysis of experiments performed on insulators used for steering plasma beams in nuclear fusion prototypes will be shown as part of this presentation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Using mathematics to model heat transfer processes in order to determine thermal properties of materials.
  • An appreciation for the usefulness of mathematics in making safer and more efficient products.

Robert L. McMasters  Bio:

Robert L. McMasters was born in Ferndale, Michigan in 1956. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis MD, in June 1978 and completed Naval Nuclear Propulsion Training in August 1979. He subsequently served as a division officer on the USS Will Rogers (SSBN 659) until 1982. Following a 2 year tour as an instructor at the S1W prototype of the Nautilus, the world?s first nuclear-powered ship, he left active duty and began working as a design engineer at K.I. Sawyer Air Force Base near Marquette Michigan and later at Michigan State University in East Lansing Michigan. He completed the Ph.D. at Michigan State University in 1997 and served there as a Visiting Assistant Professor until 2004 when he accepted a position at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Va. His research interests are in heat transfer, particularly those applied to inverse problems.

Wednesday – Workshop E
1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

This workshop will explore what engages today’s learners to help attendees understand first-hand how technology is a critical design component in student task design. We’ll identify opportunities for creating powerful tasks in the areas of engagement, academic strategies, questions, and cognition, while also exploring strategies of the digital classroom.

John Antonetti Bio

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